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283 results (BibTeX)

2015


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Reinforcement Learning vs Human Programming in Tetherball Robot Games

Parisi, S., Abdulsamad, H., Paraschos, A., Daniel, C., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 6428-6434, IROS, September 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2015

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Model-Free Probabilistic Movement Primitives for Physical Interaction

Paraschos, A., Rueckert, E., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 2860-2866, IROS, September 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Progress Prediction and Sequencing of Concurrent Movement Primitives

Manschitz, S., Kober, J., Gienger, M., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 449-455, IROS, September 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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A Probabilistic Framework for Semi-Autonomous Robots Based on Interaction Primitives with Phase Estimation

Maeda, G., Neumann, G., Ewerton, M., Lioutikov, R., Peters, J.

In Proceedings of the International Symposium of Robotics Research, ISRR, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Semi-Autonomous 3rd-Hand Robot

Lopes, M., Peters, J., Piater, J., Toussaint, M., Baisero, A., Busch, B., Erkent, O., Kroemer, O., Lioutikov, R., Maeda, G., Mollard, Y., Munzer, T., Shukla, D.

In Workshop on Cognitive Robotics in Future Manufacturing Scenarios, European Robotics Forum, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Segmentation Applied to an Assembly Task

Lioutikov, R., Neumann, G., Maeda, G., Peters, J.

In 15th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 533-540, Humanoids, November 2015 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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A Comparison of Contact Distribution Representations for Learning to Predict Object Interactions

Leischnig, S., Luettgen, S., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

In 15th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 616-622, Humanoids, November 2015 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Towards Learning Hierarchical Skills for Multi-Phase Manipulation Tasks

Kroemer, O., Daniel, C., Neumann, G., van Hoof, H., Peters, J.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 1503 - 1510, ICRA, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Optimizing Robot Striking Movement Primitives with Iterative Learning Control

Koc, O., Maeda, G., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

In 15th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 80-87, Humanoids, November 2015 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Evaluation of Interactive Object Recognition with Tactile Sensing

Hoelscher, J., Peters, J., Hermans, T.

In 15th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 310-317, Humanoids, November 2015 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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First-Person Tele-Operation of a Humanoid Robot

Fritsche, L., Unverzagt, F., Peters, J., Calandra, R.

In 15th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 997-1002, Humanoids, November 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Modeling Spatio-Temporal Variability in Human-Robot Interaction with Probabilistic Movement Primitives

Ewerton, M., Neumann, G., Lioutikov, R., Ben Amor, H., Peters, J., Maeda, G.

In Workshop on Machine Learning for Social Robotics, ICRA, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning multiple collaborative tasks with a mixture of Interaction Primitives

Ewerton, M., Neumann, G., Lioutikov, R., Ben Amor, H., Peters, J., Maeda, G.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 1535-1542, ICRA, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Motor Skills from Partially Observed Movements Executed at Different Speeds

Ewerton, M., Maeda, G., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

In Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 456-463, IROS, September 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Inverse Dynamics Models with Contacts

Calandra, R., Ivaldi, S., Deisenroth, M., Rückert, E., Peters, J.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 3186-3191, ICRA, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Torque Control in Presence of Contacts using Tactile Sensing from Robot Skin

Calandra, R., Ivaldi, S., Deisenroth, M., Peters, J.

In 15th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, pages: 690-695, Humanoids, November 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Model-Based Relative Entropy Stochastic Search

Abdolmaleki, A., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 28, pages: 3523-3531, (Editors: C. Cortes, N.D. Lawrence, D.D. Lee, M. Sugiyama and R. Garnett), Curran Associates, Inc., 29th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Humanoid Momentum Estimation Using Sensed Contact Wrenches

Rotella, N., Herzog, A., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, 2015 (conference)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Predicting Human Reaching Motion in Collaborative Tasks Using Inverse Optimal Control and Iterative Re-planning

Mainprice, J., Hayne, R., Berenson, D.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2015 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Automatic LQR Tuning Based on Gaussian Process Optimization: Early Experimental Results

Marco, A., Hennig, P., Bohg, J., Schaal, S., Trimpe, S.

Machine Learning in Planning and Control of Robot Motion Workshop at the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, September 2015 (conference)

Abstract
This paper proposes an automatic controller tuning framework based on linear optimal control combined with Bayesian optimization. With this framework, an initial set of controller gains is automatically improved according to a pre-defined performance objective evaluated from experimental data. The underlying Bayesian optimization algorithm is Entropy Search, which represents the latent objective as a Gaussian process and constructs an explicit belief over the location of the objective minimum. This is used to maximize the information gain from each experimental evaluation. Thus, this framework shall yield improved controllers with fewer evaluations compared to alternative approaches. A seven-degree-of-freedom robot arm balancing an inverted pole is used as the experimental demonstrator. Preliminary results of a low-dimensional tuning problem highlight the method’s potential for automatic controller tuning on robotic platforms.

PDF Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Project Page [BibTex]


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Trajectory generation for multi-contact momentum-control

Herzog, A., Rotella, N., Schaal, S., Righetti, L.

In IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), November 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Understanding the Geometry of Workspace Obstacles in Motion Optimization

Ratliff, N., Toussaint, M., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, March 2015 (inproceedings)

PDF Video Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Video Project Page [BibTex]


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Data-Driven Online Decision Making for Autonomous Manipulation

Kappler, D., Pastor, P., Kalakrishnan, M., Wuthrich, M., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of Robotics: Science and Systems, Rome, Italy, 2015 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Direct Loss Minimization Inverse Optimal Control

Doerr, A., Ratliff, N., Bohg, J., Toussaint, M., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of Robotics: Science and Systems, Rome, Italy, Robotics: Science and Systems XI, July 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Inverse Optimal Control (IOC) has strongly impacted the systems engineering process, enabling automated planner tuning through straightforward and intuitive demonstration. The most successful and established applications, though, have been in lower dimensional problems such as navigation planning where exact optimal planning or control is feasible. In higher dimensional systems, such as humanoid robots, research has made substantial progress toward generalizing the ideas to model free or locally optimal settings, but these systems are complicated to the point where demonstration itself can be difficult. Typically, real-world applications are restricted to at best noisy or even partial or incomplete demonstrations that prove cumbersome in existing frameworks. This work derives a very flexible method of IOC based on a form of Structured Prediction known as Direct Loss Minimization. The resulting algorithm is essentially Policy Search on a reward function that rewards similarity to demonstrated behavior (using Covariance Matrix Adaptation (CMA) in our experiments). Our framework blurs the distinction between IOC, other forms of Imitation Learning, and Reinforcement Learning, enabling us to derive simple, versatile, and practical algorithms that blend imitation and reinforcement signals into a unified framework. Our experiments analyze various aspects of its performance and demonstrate its efficacy on conveying preferences for motion shaping and combined reach and grasp quality optimization.

PDF Video Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Video Project Page [BibTex]


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On the Choice of the Event Trigger in Event-based Estimation

Trimpe, S., Campi, M.

In Proceeding of the First International Conference on Event-based Control, Communication, and Signal Processing, June 2015 (inproceedings)

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Guaranteed H2 Performance in Distributed Event-Based State Estimation

Muehlebach, M., Trimpe, S.

In Proceeding of the First International Conference on Event-based Control, Communication, and Signal Processing, June 2015 (inproceedings)

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning Optimal Striking Points for A Ping-Pong Playing Robot

Huang, Y., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 4587-4592, IROS, 2015 (inproceedings)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Learning of Non-Parametric Control Policies with High-Dimensional State Features

van Hoof, H., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, 38, pages: 995–1003, (Editors: Lebanon, G. and Vishwanathan, S.V.N. ), JMLR, AISTATS, 2015 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Leveraging Big Data for Grasp Planning

Kappler, D., Bohg, B., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a new large-scale database containing grasps that are applied to a large set of objects from numerous categories. These grasps are generated in simulation and are annotated with different grasp stability metrics. We use a descriptive and efficient representation of the local object shape at which each grasp is applied. Given this data, we present a two-fold analysis: (i) We use crowdsourcing to analyze the correlation of the metrics with grasp success as predicted by humans. The results show that the metric based on physics simulation is a more consistent predictor for grasp success than the standard ε-metric. The results also support the hypothesis that human labels are not required for good ground truth grasp data. Instead the physics-metric can be used to generate datasets in simulation that may then be used to bootstrap learning in the real world. (ii) We apply a deep learning method and show that it can better leverage the large-scale database for prediction of grasp success compared to logistic regression. Furthermore, the results suggest that labels based on the physics-metric are less noisy than those from the ε-metric and therefore lead to a better classification performance.

PDF data DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF data DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Policy Learning with Hypothesis Based Local Action Selection

Sankaran, B., Bohg, J., Ratliff, N., Schaal, S.

In Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making, 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
For robots to be able to manipulate in unknown and unstructured environments the robot should be capable of operating under partial observability of the environment. Object occlusions and unmodeled environments are some of the factors that result in partial observability. A common scenario where this is encountered is manipulation in clutter. In the case that the robot needs to locate an object of interest and manipulate it, it needs to perform a series of decluttering actions to accurately detect the object of interest. To perform such a series of actions, the robot also needs to account for the dynamics of objects in the environment and how they react to contact. This is a non trivial problem since one needs to reason not only about robot-object interactions but also object-object interactions in the presence of contact. In the example scenario of manipulation in clutter, the state vector would have to account for the pose of the object of interest and the structure of the surrounding environment. The process model would have to account for all the aforementioned robot-object, object-object interactions. The complexity of the process model grows exponentially as the number of objects in the scene increases. This is commonly the case in unstructured environments. Hence it is not reasonable to attempt to model all object-object and robot-object interactions explicitly. Under this setting we propose a hypothesis based action selection algorithm where we construct a hypothesis set of the possible poses of an object of interest given the current evidence in the scene and select actions based on our current set of hypothesis. This hypothesis set tends to represent the belief about the structure of the environment and the number of poses the object of interest can take. The agent's only stopping criterion is when the uncertainty regarding the pose of the object is fully resolved.

Web Project Page [BibTex]


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Event-based Estimation and Control for Remote Robot Operation with Reduced Communication

Trimpe, S., Buchli, J.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
An event-based communication framework for remote operation of a robot via a bandwidth-limited network is proposed. The robot sends state and environment estimation data to the operator, and the operator transmits updated control commands or policies to the robot. Event-based communication protocols are designed to ensure that data is transmitted only when required: the robot sends new estimation data only if this yields a significant information gain at the operator, and the operator transmits an updated control policy only if this comes with a significant improvement in control performance. The developed framework is modular and can be used with any standard estimation and control algorithms. Simulation results of a robotic arm highlight its potential for an efficient use of limited communication resources, for example, in disaster response scenarios such as the DARPA Robotics Challenge.

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A New Perspective and Extension of the Gaussian Filter

Wüthrich, M., Trimpe, S., Kappler, D., Schaal, S.

In Robotics: Science and Systems, 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Gaussian Filter (GF) is one of the most widely used filtering algorithms; instances are the Extended Kalman Filter, the Unscented Kalman Filter and the Divided Difference Filter. GFs represent the belief of the current state by a Gaussian with the mean being an affine function of the measurement. We show that this representation can be too restrictive to accurately capture the dependencies in systems with nonlinear observation models, and we investigate how the GF can be generalized to alleviate this problem. To this end we view the GF from a variational-inference perspective, and analyze how restrictions on the form of the belief can be relaxed while maintaining simplicity and efficiency. This analysis provides a basis for generalizations of the GF. We propose one such generalization which coincides with a GF using a virtual measurement, obtained by applying a nonlinear function to the actual measurement. Numerical experiments show that the proposed Feature Gaussian Filter (FGF) can have a substantial performance advantage over the standard GF for systems with nonlinear observation models.

Web PDF Project Page [BibTex]


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The Coordinate Particle Filter - A novel Particle Filter for High Dimensional Systems

Wüthrich, M., Bohg, J., Kappler, D., Pfreundt, C., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Parametric filters, such as the Extended Kalman Filter and the Unscented Kalman Filter, typically scale well with the dimensionality of the problem, but they are known to fail if the posterior state distribution cannot be closely approximated by a density of the assumed parametric form. For nonparametric filters, such as the Particle Filter, the converse holds. Such methods are able to approximate any posterior, but the computational requirements scale exponentially with the number of dimensions of the state space. In this paper, we present the Coordinate Particle Filter which alleviates this problem. We propose to compute the particle weights recursively, dimension by dimension. This allows us to explore one dimension at a time, and resample after each dimension if necessary. Experimental results on simulated as well as real data con- firm that the proposed method has a substantial performance advantage over the Particle Filter in high-dimensional systems where not all dimensions are highly correlated. We demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method for the problem of multi-object and robotic manipulator tracking.

arXiv Video Bayesian Filtering Framework Bayesian Object Tracking DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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LMI-Based Synthesis for Distributed Event-Based State Estimation

Muehlebach, M., Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the American Control Conference, July 2015 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents an LMI-based synthesis procedure for distributed event-based state estimation. Multiple agents observe and control a dynamic process by sporadically exchanging data over a broadcast network according to an event-based protocol. In previous work [1], the synthesis of event-based state estimators is based on a centralized design. In that case three different types of communication are required: event-based communication of measurements, periodic reset of all estimates to their joint average, and communication of inputs. The proposed synthesis problem eliminates the communication of inputs as well as the periodic resets (under favorable circumstances) by accounting explicitly for the distributed structure of the control system.

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2014


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Generalization of the tacit learning controller based on periodic tuning functions

Berenz, V., Hayashibe, M., Alnajjar, F., Shimoda, S.

In 5th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, pages: 893-898, 2014 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

2014

DOI [BibTex]


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Learning and Exploration in a Novel Dimensionality-Reduction Task

Ebert, J, Kim, S, Schweighofer, N., Sternad, D, Schaal, S.

In Abstracts of Neural Control of Movement Conference (NCM 2009), Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2014 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Full Dynamics LQR Control of a Humanoid Robot: An Experimental Study on Balancing and Squatting

Mason, S., Righetti, L., Schaal, S.

In 14th IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), 2014 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Robot Arm Pose Estimation through Pixel-Wise Part Classification

Bohg, J., Romero, J., Herzog, A., Schaal, S.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) 2014, pages: 3143-3150, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), June 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose to frame the problem of marker-less robot arm pose estimation as a pixel-wise part classification problem. As input, we use a depth image in which each pixel is classified to be either from a particular robot part or the background. The classifier is a random decision forest trained on a large number of synthetically generated and labeled depth images. From all the training samples ending up at a leaf node, a set of offsets is learned that votes for relative joint positions. Pooling these votes over all foreground pixels and subsequent clustering gives us an estimate of the true joint positions. Due to the intrinsic parallelism of pixel-wise classification, this approach can run in super real-time and is more efficient than previous ICP-like methods. We quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of this approach on synthetic data. We also demonstrate that the method produces accurate joint estimates on real data despite being purely trained on synthetic data.

video code pdf DOI Project Page [BibTex]

video code pdf DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Experiments with Hierarchical Inverse Dynamics Controllers on a Torque Controlled Humanoid

Herzog, A., Righetti, L., Grimminger, F., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of Dynamic Walking, Zürich, Switzerland, 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
We expect autonomous legged robots to perform complex tasks in persistent interaction with an uncertain and changing environment (e.g. in a disaster relief scenario). Therefore, we need to design algorithms that can generate precise but compliant motions while optimizing the interactions with the environment. In this context, torque control algorithms often offer high performance for motion control while guaranteeing a certain level of compliance. In addition they allow for direct control of interaction forces with the environment. Recent contributions have demonstrated the relevance of torque con- trol approaches for humanoid robots, for example for balanc- ing capabilities [5, 6]. Among those we find passivity-based approaches [5] that regulate the position of the Center of Mass (CoM) by applying admissible contact forces under the quasi- static assumption. On the one hand, these approaches do not rely on a precise dynamic model of the robot while natu- rally guaranteeing robustness due to the passivity property of the controller. On the other hand the quasi-static assumption might be limiting for dynamic motions. A promising way of leveraging this limitation are control algorithms that take the full dynamic model into account [6]. However, the need for a precise dynamic model, sensor noise (particularly in the ve- locities) and limited torque bandwidth makes them more chal- lenging to implement. Moreover, it is generally required to simplify the optimization process to meet time requirements of fast control loops (typically 1 kHz on modern torque con- trolled robots). Practical evaluations of both approaches are still rare due to the lack of torque controlled humanoid plat- forms and the complexity in conducting such robot experiments.

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Balancing experiments on a torque-controlled humanoid with hierarchical inverse dynamics

Herzog, A., Righetti, L., Grimminger, F., Pastor, P., Schaal, S.

Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robotics Systems, Chicago, IL, September 2014 (conference)

Abstract
Recently several hierarchical inverse dynamicscontrollers based on cascades of quadratic programs havebeen proposed for application on torque controlled robots.They have important theoretical benefits but have never beenimplemented on a torque controlled robot where model inaccuraciesand real-time computation requirements can beproblematic. In this contribution we present an experimentalevaluation of these algorithms in the context of balance controlfor a humanoid robot. The presented experiments demonstratethe applicability of the approach under real robot conditions(i.e. model uncertainty, estimation errors, etc). We propose asimplification of the optimization problem that allows us todecrease computation time enough to implement it in a fasttorque control loop. We implement a momentum-based balancecontroller which shows robust performance in face of unknowndisturbances, even when the robot is standing on only onefoot. In a second experiment, a tracking task is evaluatedto demonstrate the performance of the controller with morecomplicated hierarchies. Our results show that hierarchicalinverse dynamics controllers can be used for feedback controlof humanoid robots and that momentum-based balance controlcan be efficiently implemented on a real robot.

Video pdf DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Video pdf DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A Self-Tuning LQR Approach Demonstrated on an Inverted Pendulum

Trimpe, S., Millane, A., Doessegger, S., D’Andrea, R.

In Proceedings of the 19th IFAC World Congress, Cape Town, South Africa, 2014 (inproceedings)

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning coupling terms for obstacle avoidance

Rai, A., Meier, F., Ijspeert, A., Schaal, S.

In International Conference on Humanoid Robotics, pages: 512-518, IEEE, 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Autonomous manipulation in dynamic environments is important for robots to perform everyday tasks. For this, a manipulator should be capable of interpreting the environment and planning an appropriate movement. At least, two possible approaches exist for this in literature. Usually, a planning system is used to generate a complex movement plan that satisfies all constraints. Alternatively, a simple plan could be chosen and modified with sensory feedback to accommodate additional constraints by equipping the controller with features that remain dormant most of the time, except when specific situations arise. Dynamic Movement Primitives (DMPs) form a robust and versatile starting point for such a controller that can be modified online using a non-linear term, called the coupling term. This can prove to be a fast and reactive way of obstacle avoidance in a human-like fashion. We propose a method to learn this coupling term from human demonstrations starting with simple features and making it more robust to avoid a larger range of obstacles. We test the ability of our coupling term to model different kinds of obstacle avoidance behaviours in humans and use this learnt coupling term to avoid obstacles in a reactive manner. This line of research aims at pushing the boundary of reactive control strategies to more complex scenarios, such that complex and usually computationally more expensive planning methods can be avoided as much as possible.

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Towards Full System Linear Quadratic Regulators for Humanoid Control

Mason, S., Righetti, L., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of Dynamic Walking, Zurich, Switzerland, 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Robots that are to locomote in a human like fashion requirecontrol of high degree of freedom (DOF) motions potentiallycoupled in a complex way. It remains challenging to expressthe task objective in an intuitive way and simultaneously generatefeedback gains guaranteeing some level of optimality.In response to this, a number of different simplified modelshave been developed to highlight different aspects of the humanoidâ??sdynamics that are important for specific tasks. Ashort list of some of the models used to represent a humanoidinclude the cart-table, double inverted pendulum, reactionmass pendulum, and automatically generated task specific reducedmodels [4]. These simplified models make planningeasier but come at the cost of modelling error and limitationson motion. In addition, one is tasked with finding mappingsbetween the full system to the reduced system. These mappingscan potentially destroy the intuition surrounding the useof the simplified model as they may not always behave as expected.By working with the full dynamics, one obtains anincrease in generality, accuracy, and eliminates the need formappings.

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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State Estimation for a Humanoid Robot

Rotella, N., Bloesch, M., Righetti, L., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE/RSJ Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 952-958, Chicago, IL, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper introduces a framework for state estimation on a humanoid robot platform using only common proprioceptive sensors and knowledge of leg kinematics. The presented approach extends that detailed in prior work on a point-foot quadruped platform by adding the rotational constraints imposed by the humanoidâ??s flat feet. As in previous work, the proposed Extended Kalman Filter accommodates contact switching and makes no assumptions about gait or terrain, making it applicable on any humanoid platform for use in any task. A nonlinear observability analysis is performed on both the point-foot and flat-foot filters and it is concluded that the addition of rotational constraints significantly simplifies singular cases and improves the observability characteristics of the system. Results on a simulated walking dataset demonstrate the performance gain of the flat-foot filter as well as confirm the results of the presented observability analysis.

PDF link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

PDF link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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State Estimation for Walking Humanoids on Unknown Terrain

Rotella, N., Bloesch, M., Righetti, L., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of Dynamic Walking, Zürich, Switzerland, 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
State estimation plays a crucial role in humanoid locomotion;accurate estimates of the pose and velocity of the robotâ??s baseare necessary for walking tasks. Estimation in robotics haslong been focused on mobile robot localization, where wheelodometry and exteroceptive sensor data are fused to provideestimates of absolute position and yaw. While wheeled robotsare assumed to remain stable and in contact at all times,legged locomotion inherently involves intermittent contacts.This makes stability a concern and complicates odometrybasedapproaches, distinguishing estimation for legged systemsfrom that for wheeled robots. More recent approacheson quadruped and hexapod platforms make unreasonable assumptionsabout walking gaits, assume knowledge of the terrainand use exteroceptive sensor data for corrections. However,the utility of such platforms is their potential for operationin unstructured environments in which gaits are reactive,the terrain is unknown and such sensors are unfit for use. Motivatedby the task of providing robust and generic state estimationfor humanoid robots walking on unknown terrain, weintroduce an estimation framework [1] which employs onlyproprioceptive sensors and knowledge of leg kinematics.

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Dual Execution of Optimized Contact Interaction Trajectories

Toussaint, M., Ratliff, N., Bohg, J., Righetti, L., Englert, P., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Chicago, IL, October 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Efficient manipulation requires contact to reduce uncertainty. The manipulation literature refers to this as funneling: a methodology for increasing reliability and robustness by leveraging haptic feedback and control of environmental interaction. However, there is a fundamental gap between traditional approaches to trajectory optimization and this concept of robustness by funneling: traditional trajectory optimizers do not discover force feedback strategies. From a POMDP perspective, these behaviors could be regarded as explicit obser- vation actions planned to sufficiently reduce uncertainty thereby enabling a task. While we are sympathetic to the full POMDP view, solving full continuous-space POMDPs in high-dimensions is hard. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach in which trajectory optimization objectives are augmented with new terms that reward uncertainty reduction through contacts, explicitly promoting funneling. This augmentation shifts the responsibility of robustness toward the actual execution of the optimized trajectories. Directly tracing trajectories through configuration space would lose all robustnessâ??dual execution achieves robustness by devising force controllers to reproduce the temporal interaction profile encoded in the dual solution of the optimization problem. This work introduces dual execution in depth and analyze its performance through robustness experiments in both simulation and on a real-world robotic platform.

PDF Video DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Video DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Incremental Local Gaussian Regression

Meier, F., Hennig, P., Schaal, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 27, pages: 972-980, (Editors: Z. Ghahramani, M. Welling, C. Cortes, N.D. Lawrence and K.Q. Weinberger), 28th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

PDF link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

PDF link (url) Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Efficient Bayesian Local Model Learning for Control

Meier, F., Hennig, P., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 2244 - 2249, IROS, 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Model-based control is essential for compliant controland force control in many modern complex robots, like humanoidor disaster robots. Due to many unknown and hard tomodel nonlinearities, analytical models of such robots are oftenonly very rough approximations. However, modern optimizationcontrollers frequently depend on reasonably accurate models,and degrade greatly in robustness and performance if modelerrors are too large. For a long time, machine learning hasbeen expected to provide automatic empirical model synthesis,yet so far, research has only generated feasibility studies butno learning algorithms that run reliably on complex robots.In this paper, we combine two promising worlds of regressiontechniques to generate a more powerful regression learningsystem. On the one hand, locally weighted regression techniquesare computationally efficient, but hard to tune due to avariety of data dependent meta-parameters. On the other hand,Bayesian regression has rather automatic and robust methods toset learning parameters, but becomes quickly computationallyinfeasible for big and high-dimensional data sets. By reducingthe complexity of Bayesian regression in the spirit of local modellearning through variational approximations, we arrive at anovel algorithm that is computationally efficient and easy toinitialize for robust learning. Evaluations on several datasetsdemonstrate very good learning performance and the potentialfor a general regression learning tool for robotics.

PDF link (url) DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

PDF link (url) DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Stability Analysis of Distributed Event-Based State Estimation

Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the 53rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Los Angeles, CA, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
An approach for distributed and event-based state estimation that was proposed in previous work [1] is analyzed and extended to practical networked systems in this paper. Multiple sensor-actuator-agents observe a dynamic process, sporadically exchange their measurements over a broadcast network according to an event-based protocol, and estimate the process state from the received data. The event-based approach was shown in [1] to mimic a centralized Luenberger observer up to guaranteed bounds, under the assumption of identical estimates on all agents. This assumption, however, is unrealistic (it is violated by a single packet drop or slight numerical inaccuracy) and removed herein. By means of a simulation example, it is shown that non-identical estimates can actually destabilize the overall system. To achieve stability, the event-based communication scheme is supplemented by periodic (but infrequent) exchange of the agentsâ?? estimates and reset to their joint average. When the local estimates are used for feedback control, the stability guarantee for the estimation problem extends to the event-based control system.

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]

PDF Supplementary material DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2013


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The functional role of automatic body response in shaping voluntary actions based on muscle synergy theory

Alnajjar, F. S., Berenz, V., Shimoda, S.

In Neural Engineering (NER), 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on, pages: 1230-1233, 2013 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

2013

DOI [BibTex]